Natasha & Zak | Los Angeles, CA
Canon 50D with Pentax 50mm f/1.7

Natasha & Zak | Los Angeles, CA

Canon 50D with Pentax 50mm f/1.7

Angelo Merendino, from “My Wife’s Fight with Breast Cancer.” “In September, 2007, I married the girl of my dreams; five months later Jennifer was diagnosed with breast cancer,” Merendino told me. “Throughout our battle, we were fortunate to have a strong support group, but still struggled to get people to understand the difficulties we faced daily. I began to photograph our everyday life, hoping to show the reality of living with this horrible disease. As time passed, trust grew, and at a certain point Jen stopped feeling like she had to pose, she was just Jen…happy, sad, silly, or whatever she was feeling at that moment. Now that Jen has passed, I look at these photographs and I feel our love.”

Photographing Love by Jessie Wender http://goo.gl/UMAHX

Angelo Merendino, from “My Wife’s Fight with Breast Cancer.” “In September, 2007, I married the girl of my dreams; five months later Jennifer was diagnosed with breast cancer,” Merendino told me. “Throughout our battle, we were fortunate to have a strong support group, but still struggled to get people to understand the difficulties we faced daily. I began to photograph our everyday life, hoping to show the reality of living with this horrible disease. As time passed, trust grew, and at a certain point Jen stopped feeling like she had to pose, she was just Jen…happy, sad, silly, or whatever she was feeling at that moment. Now that Jen has passed, I look at these photographs and I feel our love.”

Photographing Love by Jessie Wender http://goo.gl/UMAHX
Sally Mann, “Ponder Heart” (2009). “In the late-winter afternoons for half a decade, I photographed my husband of forty-two years,” Mann told me. “With the weak sun coming through the studio windows, we were warmed by the woodstove and his two fingers of bourbon. I loved it, this work: the quietude; the muted burble of NPR; the exposures sometimes so long that he fell asleep. In this picture, a relatively short exposure, he was braced against the glass, holding still for the counted-out minutes. You see that slight movement at the tips of his fingers? That is the beating of his heart.” From the series “Proud Flesh,” exhibited at Gagosian Gallery/Courtesy Gagosian Gallery and Edwynn Houk Gallery.

Photographing Love by Jessie Wender http://goo.gl/UMAHX

Sally Mann, “Ponder Heart” (2009). “In the late-winter afternoons for half a decade, I photographed my husband of forty-two years,” Mann told me. “With the weak sun coming through the studio windows, we were warmed by the woodstove and his two fingers of bourbon. I loved it, this work: the quietude; the muted burble of NPR; the exposures sometimes so long that he fell asleep. In this picture, a relatively short exposure, he was braced against the glass, holding still for the counted-out minutes. You see that slight movement at the tips of his fingers? That is the beating of his heart.” From the series “Proud Flesh,” exhibited at Gagosian Gallery/Courtesy Gagosian Gallery and Edwynn Houk Gallery.

Photographing Love by Jessie Wender http://goo.gl/UMAHX

fuckyeahgirlcrush:

It’s weird for people who still have feelings to be around depressed people. They try to help you have feelings again so things can go back to normal, and it’s frustrating for them when that doesn’t happen. From their perspective, it seems like there has got to be some untapped source of happiness within you that you’ve simply lost track of, and if you could just see how beautiful things are…

At first, I’d try to explain that it’s not really negativity or sadness anymore, it’s more just this detached, meaningless fog where you can’t feel anything about anything — even the things you love, even fun things — and you’re horribly bored and lonely, but since you’ve lost your ability to connect with any of the things that would normally make you feel less bored and lonely, you’re stuck in the boring, lonely, meaningless void without anything to distract you from how boring, lonely, and meaningless it is.

Allie Brosh’s new post on her continued dealings with depression is just as poignant and heartbreaking and hilarious as her first.

funnyordie:

Let’s Just Say

Let’s just say, these dudes can’t get over how sick Maria is.

I operated the boom for this short. Check it out!